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Lindenwood to Unveil New Regional Studies Journal

Lindenwood University will unveil its new regional studies journal, “The Confluence,” in November with a selection of thoroughly researched, well-written, thought-provoking articles on the region’s past, present and future.

“The Confluence” is named for the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers and also for the collection of thoughts and ideas in each issue. Editor Jeffrey Smith, a history professor in the Lindenwood University School of Humanities, says the journal will be filled with beautifully illustrated, peer-reviewed articles on history, science, architecture, art, planning, public policy and material culture, written by contributors from throughout the region.

“As a liberal arts university, Lindenwood knows that the human experience, including our region, is shaped by the thinking of many disciplines and the convergence of ideas and topics from across the spectrum,” Smith said. “Just like our geographical location, our magazine is a confluence of ideas, topics, disciplines and thinking.”

The journal, which will publish in the fall and spring annually, sells for $12 per issue or $20 for a one-year subscription. For more information or to subscribe, visit www.lindenwood.edu/confluence or e-mail confluence@lindenwood.edu.

In the first edition, articles include: · The Roots of St. Louis Regionalism. Harland Bartholomew’s 1948 regional plan was the culmination of almost a century of regional thinking, which runs counter to what many currently see as a very local approach to government in the region.

· The History of the Illinois River and the Decline of a Native Species. A foremost authority on the plant species Boltonia discusses the endangered plant and what it tells us about the Illinois River valley and our environment as a whole.

· “We Shall Be Literally ‘Sold to the Dutch.’” punctuation Immigration has been a hot-button issue in the region since long before the current debate on the topic. This article tells about local anti-German sentiment in pre-Civil War Missouri.

· Slave and Soldier. Recently digitized court documents tell the fascinating tale of a Missouri slave who enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War—and the impact on both him and his owner.

· Against Pain. Solicitations for curative medicines, like the ones we see constantly today, are hardly new. This article tells of a patent medicine, Antikamnia Tablets, that was produced in St. Louis and ran afoul of the newly created Food and Drug Administration.

· Worker Number 74530. In 1943, a Lindenwood English professor took on an extra job at the small-arms plant in north St. Louis. This reprinted article is her captivating first-person account of how she became a “Rosie the Riveter.”

Lindenwood University, founded in 1827, is an independent liberal arts university offering 84 undergraduate degree programs and 37 graduate programs in diverse areas of study in traditional and accelerated formats. Lindenwood operates a residential campus in historic St. Charles, as well as 10 extension sites throughout the St. Louis Metropolitan area.

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Public Relations
Lindenwood University
publicRelations@lindenwood.edu




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